Am I Depressed? Take This Quiz to Find Out

Feeling down? Tired all the time? Don’t enjoy activities you used to love? You might be depressed. Take this quick quiz to see if you are showing symptoms of depression.

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Introduction

Welcome to our depression quiz. This quiz is designed to help you evaluate whether you may be depressed. Please note, this quiz is not meant to diagnose depression, but rather to provide you with some information about whether your symptoms align with those of depression.

There are many different types of depression, and each type has its own set of symptoms. Therefore, it is important to seek professional help if you think you may be depressed. A professional can help you determine the type of depression you may have and the best course of treatment.

Please answer the following questions as honestly as possible.

What is Depression?

Depression is a medical illness that affects the way you feel, the way you think and the way you act. It can interfere with your daily functioning and cause significant distress in your life.

There are different types of depression, but the most common form is major depressive disorder. This type of depression is characterized by a persistent feeling of sadness or emptiness, loss of interest in activities that you used to enjoy, sleep problems, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, changes in appetite and thoughts of death or suicide.

Depression is not a sign of weakness or something that you can just “snap out of.” It usually requires treatment to get better. But there are many effective treatments available, so if you think you may be depressed, don’t hesitate to reach out for help.

Symptoms of Depression

Depression is a mental health disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest. It can interfere with your ability to work, study, eat, sleep, and enjoy activities you once enjoyed. Depression affects how you think, feel, and behave, and can lead to physical health problems.

Symptoms of Depression
Feeling sad or “empty”
Loss of interest or pleasure in activities you once enjoyed
Change in appetite, leading to weight gain or loss
Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
Loss of energy or increased fatigue
Feeling worthless or guilty
Difficulty thinking, concentrating or making decisions
Thoughts of death or suicide
Unexplained aches and pains

Causes of Depression

Depression is a serious medical condition that can negatively affect how you feel, think, and handle daily activities, such as sleeping, eating, or working. Depression symptoms can vary from person to person, but can include persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness, loss of interest in activities you once enjoyed, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, changes in appetite or sleep patterns, and thoughts of death or suicide. While depression is common among adults, it can also occur in children and teens.

There are many possible causes of depression, including genetic factors, brain chemistry or hormones, stressful life events such as the death of a loved one or losing a job, and other medical conditions. Treatment for depression often includes medication and/or counseling.

Risk Factors for Depression

There are many different risk factors for depression, and it is important to be aware of them. Depression can be caused by a combination of genetic, biological, psychological, and environmental factors. Some of the most common risk factors for depression include:

-Family history of depression: If you have a family member who has depression, you are more likely to experience it yourself.
-Certain medical conditions: Depression is more common in people who have certain medical conditions, such as thyroid problems, heart disease, cancer, and chronic pain.
-Medications: Some medications can increase the risk for depression, such as certain blood pressure medications and sleeping pills.
-Substance abuse: People who abuse alcohol or drugs are more likely to experience depression.
-Major life changes: Depression is more common in people who have experienced major life changes, such as the death of a loved one or a divorce.
-Traumatic events: People who have experienced traumatic events, such as sexual abuse or the death of a loved one, are more likely to experience depression.

Diagnosis of Depression

Depression is a serious medical illness that negatively affects how you feel, the way you think and how you act. Fortunately, it is also treatable. Depression causes feelings of sadness or a loss of interest in activities once enjoyed. It can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems and can decrease a person’s ability to function at work and at home.

There are different types of depression, and it is important to be diagnosed by a mental health professional so that the proper treatment can be started. Treatment may include medication, psychotherapy or a combination of the two.

Treatment of Depression

While there is no one “cure” for depression, there are many effective treatments. The key is to find the treatment that is right for you. Just as every person experiences depression differently, each person will respond to different treatment options differently. Some people may need to try a few different treatments before finding one that works for them.

Common treatments for depression include:

-Medication: Antidepressants are prescribed by doctors to treat moderate to severe depression. It can take several weeks for the full effects of the medication to be felt, so it’s important to be patient and work with your doctor to find the right medication and dosage.
-Psychotherapy: Also called “talk therapy,” this is a process in which you meet with a trained mental health professional to discuss your feelings and thoughts. Psychotherapy can help you understand and work through your unique experience of depression.
-Exercise: Exercise has been shown to be an effective treatment for Depression, with benefits comparable to those of medication or psychotherapy. A simple walk around the block can make a big difference!
-Self-care: Taking care of yourself is essential when living with any chronic illness, including depression. Be sure to schedule time for activities that make you happy and help you relax, such as reading, spending time with friends or family, or listening to music.

Living with Depression

Depression is a serious medical illness. It’s more than just a feeling of being “down in the dumps” or “blue” for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million adults in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and may get worse. Depression can hurt your ability to work, study, eat, sleep, and enjoy life. The good news is that depression is treatable. You can feel better.

You may have trouble functioning at work or school when you are depressed. Your grades may suffer, or you may have many absences. Concentrating on tasks may be difficult, and completing projects may take longer than usual. You may lose interest in activities that used to give you pleasure or make you feel good about yourself. Eating habits are often affected by depression as well. Some people with depression lose their appetite and lose weight, but others overeat and gain weight. Depression can also disrupt your sleeping patterns so that it is hard to fall asleep or stay asleep, or sleep too much during the day

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